Canary in the coal mine idiom. What does It Mean to be a in a Coal 2018-08-28

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Canaries in the Health Care Coal Mines

canary in the coal mine idiom

South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society Journal. He is extremely ill-tempered and everyone is afraid to go into his office to ask him for anything--even for an answer to a simple question--for fear of being yelled at or making him angrier. Coal miners back then were extremely tough men. Too slow, but it supports what Loob said - from a different source. The canaries did not ask to be stuck underground like that. The only time I have ever heard of it being used : Firemen have referred to police officers as 'canaries'.

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Canaries in the Health Care Coal Mines

canary in the coal mine idiom

Wildlife in disaster movies assumes the role of the canary in a coal mine, fleeing the scene when catastrophe is imminent. In the above example the coral also neither knows nor understands why it is a much greater risk than anyone else, and even though no one forced it into the role, it is still acting like the canary in a coal mine by being injured or killed before conditions become to deadly for the people watching it know that bad things are coming. The miners kept canaries in cages throughout the mines, and if there was a dangerous gas leak, the canaries would be the first to die. The birds would die if methane gas became present and thereby alert miners to the danger. His ability to foresee market corrections make him look like a canary in a coal mine. By carefully observing any early indicators, industries can avoid major failures down the road or benefit from a jump on the competition. The modern carbon dioxide detector is certainly a less romantic image than a canary in an.

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canary in a coal mine meaning

canary in the coal mine idiom

Investors flipped more than 207,000 condominiums and single-family homes in 2017, the most since 2006, according to Attom. Canaries being tiny birds would choke and die earlier than a man would. If the canary died, that would signify the gas levels are poisonous to the miners as well and that they should exit the mine immediately. The idiomatic meaning appears to imply that the person playing the part of the canary is being sacrificed, if I understand correctly - something also conveyed by the Australian contributor's post. People wouldn't be looking up an article explaining the phrase if they knew what it means. In fact, the number of physician suicides—estimated at 28 to 40 per 100,000—is more than twice that of the general population, signaling that something is desperately wrong. .

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what does canary in a coal mine mean

canary in the coal mine idiom

Even as gas detection technology improved, some mining companies still relied on the canary method well into the 20th century. Not where I am sitting anyway. Canaries are especially sensitive to methane and carbon monoxide, 2 gases common in coal mines. Sentinel species are , often animals, used to detect risks to humans by providing advance warning of a danger. It tipped us off that something wasn't right. Rather than having positive or negative connotations, I think it just means that something is an early warning sign of trouble. A domestic canary, of the type historically used to detect gas in.

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Canaries in the Health Care Coal Mines

canary in the coal mine idiom

If there was a dangerous gas leak, the canary would be the first to die, and hopefully the last. As long as the canaries continued to sing, the miners were safe. An early indicator of greater danger due to a decline in health or welfare of something related. Canaries were once regularly used in as an early. In a political sense, a country's delegation abruptly leaving a meeting could be described as a canary in a coal mine for future negotiations. Modern technology is being favoured over the long-serving yellow feathered friend of the miner in detecting harmful gases which may be present underground. Is it merely to act as whistle-blower? The actual usage as I've always known it was to imply that one is being used as an unwitting subject to test the potential risk, solely for the benefit of others.

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The canary in the coalmine

canary in the coal mine idiom

The difference is that scouts are trained, equipped and aware of the risks. Because canaries tend to sing much of the time, they provided both a visual and audible cue in this respect. The last of them retired in 1999, Clare Garner for The Independent. Refers to the former practice of taking caged canaries into coal mines. Often the ideal species is determined by the characteristics of the hazard. Yahoo Answers Oct 05, 2008· They used to take a canary into coal mines back in the day Canary are weaker than humans and will die if the air quality drops If the canary dropped dead.

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Sentinel species

canary in the coal mine idiom

I believe it was in an article in a newspaper in fact. You have the expression wrong. Dogs were recognized as early as 1939 to be more susceptible to tonsil cancer if they were kept in crowded urban environments. One small event in an isolated area may not seem especially noteworthy, but it may offer the first tangible warning of a larger problem developing. Think of expressions that might be grammatically correct but sound odd to native ears - these are called non-idiomatic. What would a canary do in a coal mine? I have personally come across it only once in my - already not so short - life.

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The canary in the coalmine

canary in the coal mine idiom

I think it's a reasonably common expression. Here's an example: The boss in the office has had a very bad day--for several days in a row. For example, are susceptible to. Birds were chosen as they get air in their system when they inhale and exhale, doubling the dose of potential toxic gases. As long as the canary in a coal mine kept singing, the miners knew their air supply was safe. As long as the bird kept singing, the miners knew their air supply was safe. If a person is able to go back to live in a regular apartment instead of enjoying palace interiors, then I think that he didn't lose connection with the 'external world'.

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The canary in the coalmine

canary in the coal mine idiom

This argument is similar to one made by Gawande, who wrote about changing norms within health care practice. If the canary died, they'd evacuate the miners. Some large corporations also use a similar strategy for future growth or reduction. It's generally understood, but I can't remember reading it in current literature or hearing it in years. They acted as an early warning system. Apologies for the drive by but my understanding of the expression seems to be different from everyone else's and I just wanted to add it to the list to be considered. Miners used canaries to detect carbon monoxide and other gases in the mines.

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